True Cloud-native Development Has Yet To Go Mainstream

Cloud-native development and containerisation is redefining how software applications are built and run. The movement has captured an increasing amount of press and adoption is brisk as teams innovate modern architectures to build upon the unique capabilities of the cloud. Designing applications from the ground up to run in the cloud is also delivering more robust and flexible applications. But, while containerising apps has become very popular, many developers are simply migrating old code and processes to containers and are not yet developing true cloud native apps.

Why Is Mainstream Adoption Hard To Achieve

When you are involved and excited by an emerging technology, it is a common instinct to overestimate its impact and promise. Media enthusiasm builds in intensity and stokes interest, and when a new technology is promoted at the proof-of-concept stage, the publicity encourages developers to investigate it. Early adopters dive in, development proceeds, and success stories add to the anticipation of great things to come.

Ethics in AI

AI is a powerful and disruptive technology altering the landscape of application development and the wider world as we know it. The adoption of AI is increasing at a fast pace. While AI helps developers in every area of society to create solutions, implement change, and drive progress, it also forces us to think more deeply about our relationship with technology and the ethics of AI.

Gender Wars

The technology industry often takes credit for the changing world of work. One example is the model of remote employees working as digital nomads in their favourite coffee shop, connected via Slack and collaborating via the cloud to create products and services for consumption over the internet or on smartphones and tablets. But what about work within the technology industry itself? We take a look at the profile of women in technology and compare it with the profile of their male counterparts.

Developer Economics survey Q4 2018 prize draw winners

Here are the winners of the Developer Economics survey Q4 2018 prize draw! Congratulations to all the lucky ones! Stay tuned for the new survey announcements and new prizes coming in Q2 2019.

Dev Evolution: Meet Vasil from AndroidPal

In our latest installment of Dev Evolution interviews, we talked with AndroidPal on how their tool creates value for developers and what technologies they are using to create their tool.

The battle: Tensorflow vs Pytorch

From the 3,000 developers involved in ML or DS we saw that 43% of them use PyTorch or Tensorflow. This 43% is not equally distributed between the two frameworks. Tensorflow is 3.4 times bigger than PyTorch. A total of 86% of ML developers and data scientists, said they are currently using Tensorflow, while only 11%, were using PyTorch.

Virtual reality: Where did it all go wrong?

I worked in the smartphone industry before it came of age. Our mission was “a smartphone in every pocket” at a time when simple feature phones like the Motorola RAZR were the must-have communications device. Within a few years of our early projects, the competitor, Apple, launched the iPhone. The rest is history. The App Store opened its doors, the stars aligned, the technology dream was realised and smartphones went on to rule the world.

Evolving technology and new channels help more game developers make money

The Fortnite phenomenon has captured the attention of the gaming community and exemplifies many of the changes that have occurred over the past 18 months in the industry. Gaming has become much more social, and watching expert gamers execute perfect moves can be just as much fun as playing them. This creates a new channel for developers to promote their games and new ways to generate revenues. Fortnite first gained popularity when rock star streamer Ninja and rapper Drake streamed their game-play on Twitch. This shift is influencing revenue models and opportunities for developers. The trend is also helping to shift development to the web.

The largest developer community: a critical view

When developers evaluate new technologies, one of the elements they often look at is the size and strength of the community surrounding that technology. “Can I get help and support from peers when needed?” It’s one of the reasons why open source technologies tend to be so popular. Conversely, technology vendors regularly signal their virtue with community numbers: “Our product is used by millions of developers, choose us!”