Developer Economics

Developer Economics

Gender Wars

The technology industry often takes credit for the changing world of work. One example is the model of remote employees working as digital nomads in their favourite coffee shop, connected via Slack and collaborating via the cloud to create products and services for consumption over the internet or on smartphones and tablets. But what about work within the technology industry itself? We take a look at the profile of women in technology and compare it with the profile of their male counterparts.

Evolving technology and new channels help more game developers make money

The Fortnite phenomenon has captured the attention of the gaming community and exemplifies many of the changes that have occurred over the past 18 months in the industry. Gaming has become much more social, and watching expert gamers execute perfect moves can be just as much fun as playing them. This creates a new channel for developers to promote their games and new ways to generate revenues. Fortnite first gained popularity when rock star streamer Ninja and rapper Drake streamed their game-play on Twitch. This shift is influencing revenue models and opportunities for developers. The trend is also helping to shift development to the web.

Developer Heroes: Amanda the Iron Woman.

My dad was a developer in the 90s so I grew up around computers. We built my first computer together in grade school and I discovered HTML and JavaScript (the early edition). I eventually moved on to PHP and, at the risk of dating myself here, made a Neopets clone. I still have the original codebase -- it was written for PHP4.

Developer Heroes: Meet Marcus from the Legion

My first experience of programming came when I was roughly 10 years old, using view-source to look at how websites were made and changing them in Notepad to see what happens. I think the first thing I completed was a DragonBall Z fan site.

Developer Heroes: Meet Rachel a.k.a the Wonder Woman

“We get a lot of requests for emerging technologies from clients, but they aren’t necessarily sure what to do with them.”